Chocolate frog: The new species of New Guinea frog has a nice chocolate color

Chocolate frog: The new species of New Guinea frog has a nice chocolate color. A team of researchers led by Griffith University has described a new species in the genus of Australian tree frogs Litoria from the rainforests of New Guinea. Steve Richards. Litoria is a large genus of tree frogs found in Australia, the Bismarck Islands, the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, the Lesser Sunda Islands, and the Moluccas.

Chocolate frog

The genus contains more than 90 species and belongs to the monotypic Littorancy subfamily in the family Pelodrididae. The new species, called Litoria mira, is endemic to New Guinea and widespread in lowland swamp forests. “Once we saw the new species, we called it the chocolate frog and the name stuck,” said Dr. Paul Oliver, a researcher at the Museum of Queensland and Griffith University.

 

Littoria mire’s closest known relative is the Australian green tree frog (Litoria caerula). The two species look similar, except that they are generally green in color, while the newer species generally have a beautiful chocolate color. “What’s a bit surprising about this discovery is that Australia’s famous and common green tree frog has an ancient relative that lives in the foothills of the New Guinea lowland rainforest,” he said.

So we named the new frog Littoria Mira because the word Mira in Latin means surprising or strange. Dr Steve Richards, a researcher at the South Australian Museum, said: “Since the frog lives in very hot, swampy areas with lots of crocodiles, all of this discourages exploration.”

While New Guinea is not a place that most Australians know well; Many groups of animals are shared. So understanding the biodiversity in New Guinea helps us understand the history and origins of Australia’s unique fauna.

While Australia and New Guinea were connected by land during the late Tertiary era (2.6 million years ago) and share many biological elements, New Guinea is now dominated by rainforests and savannas in northern Australia.

“It is important to address the organic offset between these two regions to understand how the jungle and savanna habitat types have expanded and contracted,” said Dr. Oliver.

“Estimates of divergence of the new species in our study suggest that there was still contact between the two species in the lowland tropical habitats of northern Australia and New Guinea in the Pliocene (5.3 to 2.6 million years ago years)”.

chocolate frog
chocolate frog

“These results emphasize that the extent and connectivity of lowland rainforest and savanna environments in northern Australia and southern New Guinea and the region have undergone profound changes since the late Pliocene epoch.” An article describing the discovery appears in the Australian Journal of Zoology.

Chocolate frog

A new chocolate frog reveals the long-standing relationship between Australia and New Guinea. Litoria mira, a newly discovered chocolate frog described by scientists at Griffith University and the Queensland Museum, is shedding light on a long-standing relationship between Australia and New Guinea.

Lead author Dr Paul Oliver of the Queensland Center for Planetary Health and Food Safety and Museums. Tree frogs are generally known for their green fur, but once lead author Dr. Paul Oliver of the Center for Planetary Health and Food Safety and the Queensland Museum noticed the brown fur of the new species Litoria look, they started calling it chocolate. . Frog and pasted the name.

Dr Oliver said: “The closest known relative of Litoria mire is the Australian green tree frog. The two species generally resemble each other except for the green color, while the newer species generally have a beautiful chocolate color.”

“We called this new species of Litoria frog Mira, which means surprise or strange in Latin, because we found a more visible relative of the well-known and common green tree Austellia, which lives in the lowland rainforests of New Guinea, an amazing discovery. “

Paper co-author Steve Richards of the South Australian Museum said researchers thought the species was widespread in New Guinea. “Since the frog lives in very hot swampy areas where there are a lot of crocodiles, all of these things discourage exploration,” Richards said.

“While New Guinea is not a well-known place to most Australians, many groups of animals are shared. Therefore, understanding the biodiversity in New Guinea can help us understand the history and origins of Australia’s unique fauna. Meets.

While Australia and New Guinea were connected by land during the late Tertiary (2.6 million years ago) and share many biological elements, New Guinea is now dominated by rainforests and savannas in northern Australia.

“Resolving the biological exchange between these two regions is important to understanding how forest and savanna habitat types expand and contract over time,” said Dr. Oliver.

“The divergence estimates of the new species in our study suggest that there was still connectivity between the two species in tropical habitats in the lowlands of northern Australia and New Guinea in the Pliocene (5.3 to 2.6 million years ago ).

“These results emphasize that the extent and connectivity of lowland rainforest and savanna environments in northern Australia and southern New Guinea and the region have undergone profound changes since the Pliocene.” The new article was published in the Australian Journal of Zoology.

Scientists have identified a new (and very sweet) species of ‘chocolate frog’. Scientists have made a truly ridiculous discovery. It is a new species of frog. The frog in question, Littoria mira, is a tree frog called a “chocolate frog” because of its brown color. Australian researchers have found frogs in the lowland rainforest swamps of New Guinea.

Chocolate frog

“The closest relative of Litoria mira is the Australian green tree frog,” said Paul Oliver, a phylogenetic scholar at Griffith University and the Queensland Museum. “The two seeds are identical, one is usually green, but the new one is usually a nice chocolate color,” says the press release.

Hello, it's a chocolate frog!

There are other differences as well, such as tiny purple spots on the sides of the newly discovered frog’s eyes. The chocolate frog is also small. In an Oliver article published last month, researchers first discovered it in 2016.

Australian vet Steve Richards said the frogs were found in inaccessible places, which may be why scientists were not aware of frogs before. Manning told the River Times … There are a lot of mosquitoes that are wet, pointed and spread malaria.

[The mosquitoes] are flooded, the crocodiles and there aren’t many roads, he said, explaining that the day he found the chocolate frog he had to avoid a swarm of giant hornets. It’s a very uncomfortable workplace. Researchers believe that the little brown frog may be quite widespread in New Guinea.

The frog’s scientific name is Oliver, according to Science Alert, a tribute to the wonder scientists felt at the time of discovery. A statement from Griffith University said … “We call this new species of frog Mira Litria, which means ‘wonder’ or ‘strange’ in Latin. [The frog] I live in the lowland rainforests of New Guinea,” he said.

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