Marine researchers have discovered the largest aggregation of fish in the abyssal depths. Marine biologists from the United States and the United Kingdom recorded more than 100 deep-sea jackfruit ales identified as Ileophis rx in a 1-kg bait pack deployed at an abyssal seamount peak in the southeastern Clarion-Clipperton area in the Middle Pacific Ocean Done.

This is the highest number of fats per kilogram of fish on record below 1,000 m (3,281 ft), including large organic falls such as sitas and shark carcasses. It is also the highest number ever recorded in the depths of a trench of any type or size.

Ilyophis arx eels gather around a small bait pack placed on the crest of an unnamed abyssal seamount in the southwest area of Clarion – Cliparton in the central Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Deep C Fish Ecology Lab, University of Hawaii.

The abyssal rim is a deep seamount whose top is 3,000 meters (9,800 feet) below sea level. They dot the shores of the deep sea and have some of the least sought-after habitats on Earth. Abyssal fish communities are very difficult to determine.

Trawls generally find less abundance than visual methods, and some studies are biased to avoid noise and light from some species. The best cameras provide an efficient and unobtrusive alternative method of viewing large numbers of deep-sea fish, scavengers.

And predators as they mimic the natural food where these animals naturally congregate and are part of their diet. Form a regular part. This method uses some low-density, high-mobility, and high-sensitivity challenges to attract individuals from the surrounding area for a census in front of the camera.

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute postdoctoral researcher Drs. “Our comments have really surprised us,” Astrid Letner said. “We have never seen such a high number of deep-sea fish populated with limited food.”

Dr. Leitner and his colleagues sampled the abyssal seamounts and surrounding plains in the Clarion-Cliparton zone, a large area roughly extending from Hawaii to Mexico, with deep-sea extraction of metals such as copper, cobalt, zinc. Looking for Y manganese.

Atop one of the three previously unmapped and completely unexplored seamotes, they captured video of a flock of 115 katate eels in a small bait pack containing 1 kg of mackerel.

Some eels were caught in a bait trap and Ilophis rx, a little-known species with fewer than 10 specimens, was identified in fish collections around the world.

These eels were seen on top of all seamotes, but not in the surrounding abyss. The findings provide evidence for an abyssal seamount effect (where these mountains can host a much larger number of animals than other nearby habitats) and also indicate that these eels are likely seamount specialists.

After returning from the expedition, the authors determined that they had recorded the largest number of fish ever recorded in the abyssal ocean at the same time, almost double the previous record.

Traditionally, abyss sea waves are considered low-abundance megafannel habitats with populations limited by challenging environmental conditions (low food availability, low temperatures, high pressures).

But these generalizations occur at the peak of the seam at depth from the abyss. It may not apply, he said. How can such a high number of active megafinal predators be placed in a relatively small and reasonably isolated area of the abyssal seafloor at the peak of the seamount?

“Are these permanent resident eels or these almanac aggregations?” The abyssal cement can provide unusual laboratories with a great abundance of top predators to detect the flow of carbon and the availability of energy in the food webs of the abyss.

The findings were published in Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers Journal. The largest aggregation of fish was recorded in the abyssal deep sea.

In a small bait package placed on the crest of an unnamed abyssal seamount in the southwest area of Clarion Clippen at 3,083 m, floated jackfruit ileis (Ileophis Rx, Family Cinephobranchidae).

Sincerely: Deep Sea Fish Ecology Lab, Astrid Littner and Jeff Drezen, Department of Oceanography, SOEST University of Hawaii Mano, DPCCZ Campaign.

The largest aggregation of fish recorded in the abyssal depths was made by a team from the University of Hawaii, Manoa (UH, USA).

The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI, USA) And the National Oceanography Center (NOC, UK). Their findings were recently published in Deep-Sea Research.

“Our observation has really taken us by surprise,” said study lead author Astrid Letner, who did this work as a graduate researcher at UH Manoa’s School of Ocean and Land Science and Technology (SOAST).

There were no reports of such high numbers of populated deep-sea fish with limited food.

Researchers such as Leitner, Jennifer Durden (NOC), and Professors Jeffrey Drezen (Leitner’s Ph.D. Research Advisor) and Craig Smith commented on an expedition to the Clarion Clipperton Zone (CCZ).

The CCZ is a large area stretching from Hawaii to Mexico, with exploration for deepwater mining involving metals such as copper, cobalt, zinc, and manganese.

Abyssal seamounts, deep seamounts whose peaks lie 9,800 feet (3,000 m) below the sea’s surface, dot the deep shoreline and are the most sought-after habitat on the planet.

During the expedition, the research team sampled three of these veins and the surrounding plains as part of an effort to establish an ecological baseline prior to extraction activities.

On the crest of one of the three previously uncharted and completely unexplored seamotes, the team captured a flock of 115 katethe eels (Family Sinophobrichidae) in a small bait pack, with about two pounds (1 kg) of mackerel.

Some eels were caught in a bait trap and Ilophis rx, a little-known species with fewer than 10 specimens, was identified in fish collections around the world.

These eels were seen on top of all seamotes, but not in the surrounding abyss. The findings provide evidence for an abyssal seamount effect.

Where these mountains can host a much larger number of animals than other nearby habitats and also indicate that these eels are likely seamount specialists.

After returning from the expedition, the team determined that they had recorded the largest number of fish ever recorded in the abyssal ocean at the same time, almost double the previous record.

If this phenomenon is not just the separation of these two veins in the CCZ, the implications for the ecology of the deep sea may be widespread, said Leitner. Now a postdoctoral researcher at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.

Our findings highlight how much remains to be explored in the deep sea and how much damage we can all suffer if we don’t manage mining properly. The largest aggregation of fish in the abyssal depths of the sea.

Jackfruit eels (Ileophis rx, Family Cinephobrinchidae) hovering in a small bait pack placed on the crest of an unnamed abyssal seamount in the southwest of the Clarion Klepian Zone at a depth of 3083 m (1.92 miles).

Deep Sea Fish Ecology Lab, Astrid Littner and Jeff Drajan, Department of Oceanography, Air Manoa SOEST University, video courtesy of the DPCCZ campaign.

The largest aggregation of fish recorded in an abasanal deep sea was discovered by a team of oceanographers at Manera, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.

And during 2018 by the National Center for Oceanography at the University of Hawaii. NOAA Ocean Exploration and Research, Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation and University of Hawaii.

Their findings were recently published in Deep-Sea Research.

Our comments have really taken us by surprise, said lead study author Astrid Littner, who did this work as a graduate researcher at UH Maona’s School of Oceanic and Terrestrial Science and Technology (SOAST).

I have never seen such a high number of deep-sea fish populated with limited food. Researchers such as Leitner, Jennifer Durden (NOC), and Professors Jeffrey Drezen (Leitner’s Ph.D.

Research Advisor) and Craig Smith commented on the Clarion Cliparton Zone (CCZ) campaign. The CCZ is a large area stretching from Hawaii to Mexico, with exploration for deepwater mining involving metals such as copper, cobalt, zinc, and manganese.

Abyssal seamounts, deep seamounts whose peaks lie 3,000 meters (9,800 feet) below the sea surface, dot the deep seas and are some of the lowest discovered habitats on the planet.

During the expedition, the research team sampled three of these veins and the surrounding plains as part of an effort to establish an ecological baseline prior to extraction activities.

At the top of one of three completely unexplored and uncharted seamounts, the team captured a flock of 115 katethe eels (Family Sinophobrichidae) in a small bait pack, with about two pounds (1 kg) of mackerel.

Some eels were caught in a bait trap and Ilophis rx, a little-known species with fewer than 10 specimens, was identified in fish collections around the world. These eels were seen on top of all seamotes, but not in the surrounding abyss.

The findings provide evidence for an abyssal seamount effect (where these mountains can host a much larger number of animals than other nearby habitats) and also indicate that these eels are likely seamount specialists.

After returning from the expedition, the team determined that they had recorded the largest number of fish ever recorded in the deep ocean. Almost double the previous record.

If this phenomenon is not just the separation of these two veins in the CCZ, the implications for the ecology of the deep sea may be widespread, said Leitner.

Now a postdoctoral researcher at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Institute. Our findings highlight how much is yet to be explored in the deep sea and how much we can lose if we don’t manage mining properly.

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